Tag Archives: Purchasing

How Do You Build in a Declining Market? Five Solutions

Situation: Revenue for a product and craft business has been slipping. At the same time, their competition has been disappearing. It is clear to the CEO that demand is and will continue to be present because of the market that the company serves. The question is how to maintain the profitability to survive long-term. How do you build in a declining market?

Advice from the CEOs:

  • The keys to recovery in a business like this will be in two areas: improving sales and increasing margins.
  • To increase sales the choices are more aggressive marketing and selling to existing customers or creating new markets like previous generations did when they started the business. Consider services that you could bundle with your products to augment the ways that customers use them. It will be the responsibility of your sales and marketing teams to demonstrate these product/service bundles to increase sales both to new and existing customers. This will help to solve the revenue slippage.
  • The other side is ongoing efforts to reduce cost which will, in turn, improve your margins. Costs can be reduced in creative ways that are not obvious. These include improvements in purchasing, reduction of waste, recycling of component materials, and inventory controls. It will be the responsibility of your production, purchasing and inventory management teams to develop these solutions. Assure that these teams are recognized and rewarded for their solutions.
  • Look at the segments of your product offering. Are they declining at the same rate or are there differences? This will help you to focus your efforts, as a company, to grow market share even if the overall market is declining.
  • Other suggestions for increasing sales:
    • Take advantage of the craft trends. Do this with NEW talent – not tired talent.
    • Consider partnerships and collaborations.
    • Set up contests and craft classes.
    • Look at how other industries promote to the craft industry and follow their lead.
    • Consider kitted craft products.

How Do You Respond to Unrealistic Demands? Six Suggestions

Situation: A tech company is having difficulty with a customer. Given three options – high quality, low cost and rapid delivery – the company can deliver any combination of two, but the customer wants all three. When the company asks which two are most important, the customer responds that they want all three. How do you respond to unrealistic demands?

Advice from the CEOs:

  • The Devil’s Advocate response to this question is to look at your processes. Is it possible to do all three, and if so under what circumstances?
  • Think from the perspective of the customer:
    • What will you need and when?
    • Integrate the customer into the decision process as much as possible.
    • Demonstrate where trade-offs exist, and work through these in binary fashion until you reach agreement on the scope of work, delivery timeline and price.
  • The challenges change depending upon who within the customer company you are working. For example, the engineers understand the challenges and complexity of the product in question. However, the purchasing agents do not necessarily understand the product, its complexity, or how critical it is to their final product.
    • In this case try bargaining with the purchasing agent – if the purchasing agent goes back to the engineers and gets their agreement that your company can change the quality or delivery spec, perhaps you can be flexible in your pricing. Put the ball in the PA’s court – but make sure that the PA knows that he/she will be responsible for any project delays for not giving you the order today
  • Use stories to set expectations – better yet, use stories, combined with metrics about the costs associated with attempting short-cuts to develop authoritative arguments in support of your position.
  • Create a User Guide for your customers – paper and web formats – to sell your story. Sell fear, uncertainty and doubt; for example, if the PA wants to go another route here are the potential costs in terms of time, market share and profits lost.
  • In particularly difficult negotiations, use the real estate mantra: Some Will, Some Won’t, So What, Who’s Next?

How Do You Respond to Pressure to Cut Prices? Six Guidelines

Situation: One client represents a majority of a company’s revenue. They have multiple contracts with this client. A new purchasing agent is on a mission to reduce purchasing costs, and claims that other suppliers cost less. What’s the best response?

Advice from the CEOs:

  • Spend time with your true client – the employees and managers who have chosen your product. These people stand to gain the most from an ongoing relationship with you and may be able to reduce the pressure from purchasing.
  • Assemble testimonials and metrics from the client to show that you produce a better result at lower cost than they can get from other suppliers.
  • Simultaneously, reduce your overhead so that if you must cut prices to retain the business, you can afford it.
  • If you must cut prices, you have other options:
    • Reduce the cost of resources producing the product and service. Let your client contacts know that you are being forced to do this. This may prompt them to argue that they need more senior experience from your team at the higher rate.
    • Offer lower prices in exchange for higher volume and longer term purchasing commitments. This can lock out the competition by reducing the frequency of contract renewals.
  • Remember that the job of the purchasing agent is to reduce costs. The agent who is hounding you is hounding other suppliers as well. If they can negotiate savings from 30% of the suppliers, it’s a big win. Get your ducks in line so that you aren’t in that 30%.

Key Words: Purchasing, Contract, Purchasing Agent, Cost, Client, Customer, Metrics, Cutting Prices, Purchase Commitment