Tag Archives: Pain

Do You Share Company Costs with Customers? Five Points

Situation: A B2B company has historically negotiated pricing with customers individually. While there are similarities between customers, each receives a product customized to their needs. The CEO is considering creating a “full disclosure” pricing model including their costs and seeks feedback from others. Do you share company costs with customers?

Advice from the CEOs:

  •  With only two exceptions, the CEOs did not agree with the concept of fully disclosing their cost structure to the customer.
    • The industry exceptions were public construction and government work. Some cities and the federal government require cost breakdowns and mark-ups by regulation.
  • The difficulty with the profit or license line, however it’s labeled, is that it becomes obvious that this is the company’s profit ‘nut.” This may be shared with a CEO that you respect; however, if the CEO shares this information with others in the organization your cost breakdown may become the basis for future line-by -line negotiations for cost reduction. Those with whom your company negotiates will be acting in their company’s interests, not yours.
  • The key is to optimizing pricing is to identify and sell a solution to the customer’s pain. If you do your homework well, and the customer is the right prospect, the price that you charge will pale in comparison to the costs that the customer seeks to avoid.
  • In your first negotiation, make sure that you have identified the customer’s pain and are presenting a value that addresses this pain. Only after you set expectations and have assured balance of effort do you go into more detail about your cost structure. Even here, only share detailed cost information if you deem this critical to the sale.
  • Look at it this way – price is not the key issue. The key issue is whether you can solve the customer’s problem and do so while providing an appropriate return on investment for the customer.

How do You Manage a Key Partner Relationship? Five Points

Situation: A company was created from IP originally developed by the founder at a large corporation that was not interested in commercializing it. The new company has now become successful and visible, with the large corporation as an important partner. The CEO wants to make sure that she has all bases covered to secure the future of the new company. How do you manage a key partner relationship?

Advice from the CEOs:

  • There must be clear agreement between the company and partner on ownership of the original IP – a legal document signed by both parties. You can bet that should a conflict arise, the lawyers representing the larger company will argue that their client owns the IP. Once this is secured, focus on developing and licensing software that you clearly own.
  • Develop contingency plans should the key partner decide to exit the business on which your relationship is based. Identify what other companies could replace lost revenue. Start to build these relationships.
  • If the partner helps to fund current development, take the money that you save and develop your own IP, independent of the partner relationship. As an alternative, at least develop critical components of the software as your own IP, without using the partner’s funding.
    • This will free you to develop other customer segments to broaden your business base.
  • What concerns does the partner have? Strategically, large corporations can be uncomfortable if they feel dependent upon a much smaller company. There are two things that you do:
    • Makes a concerted effort to assure that you are essential to the large corporation’s overall business.
    • Make change as painful as possible.
  • How would you get paid if the large partner exited the relationship?
    • Negotiate a contract with a 2-year window to any change that partner wants to make. This will provide you with the room to develop new clientele should the partner exit.
    • Have contingency plans to rebuild capabilities that might be lost and sell it to other clients.
    • Customize your software by client. In the process, you will develop new methods to keep your edge over competitors.
    • Keep critical parts of your processes “manual” so that they are essentially trade secrets and not easily replicable if the partner were to try to take over the IP.

How Do You Facilitate Management Change? Four Suggestions

Situation: Historically the management of a company has been family and a few long-term managers who’ve grown with the company. Some of these managers have reached their limit. Over the last couple of years, the company has added new, high capacity management. Who do they do with existing managers who can’t keep up? How do you facilitate management change?

Advice from the CEOs:

  • This is why packages exist. Employees, even key managers are not forever. As a company grows both its needs and culture must grow. There comes the time in the life and growth of most every company when certain managers are unable to accommodate this growth or adapt to the changing culture. You may well find that these managers are not very happy and no longer feel at home. Whatever the case, it is better that they move on.
  • Who creates the package?
    • You or your HR manager come up with the outline.
    • Get professional advice if you have none in-house.
  • Is there a moral issue – our commitment to our employees?
    • If an individual is demotivated, they are not contributing – this solves the moral issue.
    • If the individual is terminated amicably this can be for the best – for both parties.
  • How do you ease the pain of separation, both for the individual and the company?
    • Packages can be adapted to the situation.
    • Take the example of a manager who has made important contributions in the past, and who has good relations with others in the company, but doesn’t have the skills to adapt to the next level. Include a generous term of job search assistance. If the separation is amicable, offer them space, computer and a telephone to facilitate their job search. This can ease the separation.