Tag Archives: Labor

How Do You Bridge a Short-Term Cash Crunch? Three Options

Situation: A technology company has grown rapidly over the last year. Two customers representing a significant share of business have temporarily reduced orders for one quarter, resulting in a cash crunch until these orders resume. How do you bridge a short-term cash crunch?

Advice from the CEOs:

  • Do you feel relatively secure that once the quarter is over these orders will resume and your cash crunch will be resolved? If so, ask your bank to increase your cash line. Explain the situation, the companies involved, their order history and the expected timing until you get your next payments. A letter from each company saying that they plan to resume orders will help your case. Be aware that the bank may request a personal guarantee to substantially increase your credit line.
    • If you have to personally guarantee a line of credit extension, make sure that you see this as an acceptable risk, and that you can trust the customers to come through with their orders as promised.
  • If you produce products or subcomponents critical to these customers, ask whether they will extend a bridge loan or make a payment against future orders to assure their place in your production queue once their orders resume. You may have to escalate this request within the customer companies if you are currently dealing with purchasing personnel or lower level management.
  • Can you redeploy excess labor to other projects during the cash crunch? You will have to do this carefully so that you can rapidly redeploy these resources to priority projects once a large order comes in from one of these customers.

In Challenging Times Do You Cut Losses? Three Considerations

Situation: A company lost money last year, but turned the corner with a profitable final quarter. One of the company’s divisions continues to lose money, though the losses are small compared to the total picture. The CEO is considering cutting this business. What factors should the CEO consider in making this decision?

Advice from the CEOs:

  • What expense factors contributed to the loss?
    • The biggest factor was allocation of vehicle and space expense. This division has seasonal revenue but carries the allocated expenses for the full year.
  • Make sure that your allocated expenses are fair to the business. Do overhead allocations reflect utilization? Unless closing the business eliminates vehicles or space, if you terminate this business these expenses will be borne by the rest of the company.
    • Study your allocations by shifting the allocation made to this business to other businesses. What is the impact on their profitability?
    • If you find that the current allocation does not reflect utilization and adjust accordingly, does the business still lose money?
    • If this division covers its direct expenses along with most of its allocated expenses, a small loss in this division may be preferable to a reduction in profitability of other businesses from closing the division.
  • How strategic is this division to the overall business mix?
    • Is this business essential to your product/service mix or just a customer convenience? If you terminated the business will customers be upset?
    • Do competitors offer this service, and would you be disadvantaged by discontinuing it?
  • What are the alternatives?
    • Can you raise prices to increase profitability and refuse business that does not meet this pricing?
    • Can you restrict the offering to less price sensitive customers?
    • Can you refer customers to other vendors or sub out this business?
    • Can you reduce the scope of the offering while adjusting pricing to enhance profitability?
    • Can you source other labor alternatives to reduce cost?

Category: Strategy, Service

Key Words: Profitable, Loss, Division, Business, Critical, Factors, Expense, Allocation, Seasonal, Overhead, Loss Limit, Customer, Price, Competition, Offering, Scope, Labor, Skilled, Contractor